Posted in Television

In Stark We Trust

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Eyeing the Past: The Three-Eyed Raven and Bran Stark

We “Game of Thrones” fanatics never doubted it for a minute.

The build-up was tremendous. Try as she might, Melisandre seemingly could not bring Jon Snow back to life. Not really surprising, considering his chest was riddled with wounds. But the pay-off came in a bit of delayed action mojo when we finally saw Jon draw his first agonized breath, eyes wide open in shock. Let the games begin!

This last scene of Episode 2, “Home,” was a superb bookend to what we saw at the beginning of the show. In a surprise move, Bran Stark, missing since Season 4, made his reappearance. Although now in late adolescence, he’s still under the tutelage of the Three-Eyed Raven. Bran is a young man of many talents, not the least of which is his ability to warg, i.e., leave his crippled body and inhabit another, fully ambulatory. He’s since added time travel to his skill-set, and in a poignant sequence he watches his father and Uncle Benjen as young children learning sword play. Bran’s stroll down memory lane at Winterfell affords us a glimpse not only of Lyanna, whose rape and murder presaged the events of the GoT saga, but also the teen-aged stable boy Hodor, who not only can speak, but whose name is actually Wilys. I can’t wait for more Winterfell back story.

In a move that made me jump, Ramsey Bolton knifed his father to death upon learning of the birth of his half-brother. Apparently the assurance from Daddy Roose that “I’ll always consider you my firstborn” wasn’t good enough. In a way I was disappointed. Given Roose’s role in the Red Wedding, I was hoping the show runners would save him for a revenge killing by one of the Stark kids. Lady Stoneheart, where are you?

Ramsey’s dispatch of Walda Frey and her son via unleashed hounds underscored my growing Ramsey fatigue. I get it—he’s so villainous that the show runners are forced to up the grue ante every week. But they’ve made Ramsey so awful that he’s becoming a parody of himself. There’s always been an element of not-quite camp with Ramsey and pronouncements like “I always wanted to be an only child” following the murder of his half-brother undermine the tone of his actions, and not in a good way. I relish black comedy, but I much prefer the badinage of Varys and Tyrion. The wit displayed is far sharper.

Speaking of which, I was glad to see:

–Tyrion making new friends. Nothing like cultivating Daenerys’ left-behind dragons to create a reptilian air force.

–Arya finally getting off the schneid and evidently undertaking Step Two toward becoming No One.

–More scenes in the North with Sansa and Brienne. It’s always magical to see the snow falling in the mists of Winterfell.

–Theon Greyjoy, maimed as he is, heading home to vie for the kingship of the Iron Islands. A coming struggle between Theon and his sister should prove far more interesting than the doings of the Sand Snakes.

–The ongoing clash of the Lannisters and the High Sparrow (jonathan Pryce), a wonderfully passive-aggressive villain (Not a few will cheer when he finally gets his). A repentant Tommen’s reliance on the once again empowered Cersei makes a wonderful addition to the mix. Good times should shortly ensue.

“Game of Thrones” now seems fully under way once more. Sunday can’t come soon enough.

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One thought on “In Stark We Trust

  1. Been a fan of Jonathan Pryce since the film derived from Ray Bradbury’s “Something Wicked This Way Comes” but am all too ready to see his sparrow fall. Loved the scenes with Tyrion and the dragons. Still baffled by the sudden appearance of the murderer of Theon Greyjoy’s father. Like you, am full to the brim with the gratuitous violence via Ramsay Bolton. A bit skeptical at Davos’ petitition to Melisandre, but not surprised that the Lord of Light decided to shake things up and come through with Jon’s resurrection. I chose to believe it was through Ghost’s fervent wishing that brought him master back to him. hah 🙂

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